Home » Feature » BMW Dealers Crying For More New 5 Series
BMW Dealers Crying For More New 5 Series

BMW Dealers Crying For More New 5 Series

BMW appears to have a good problem on its hands. Demand for the company’s redesigned 5 Series is higher than projected, leading to tight supplies across the U.S. Subsequently, BMW dealerships are hollering for more product.

At the end of March BMW had just 200 unsold 5 Series sedans in inventory, according to Ludwig Willisch, head of BMW Group Region Americas. The company says it had 2,000 pre-orders for the car before production of it even started.

“Was it really expected to be that low? I don’t think so, but it’s one of the nicer problems to have,” added Willisch to Automotive News.

A good problem that is stressing BMW dealerships out. Most BMW dealerships currently have less than a 15-day supply of 5 Series in stock, considerably less than usual. Compounding out demand issue is the fact BMW is offering strong lease deals and loyalty rebates to existing BMW owners on the car. BMW has also confirmed it is spending about 20 percent more on marketing for the new 5 Series launch than it typically spends.

Apparently the renewed efforts are working.

 

 





 

About Nick Saporito

AutoVerdict Senior Editor Nick Saporito began writing about cars at age 13. Nick ran a couple of automotive enthusiast sites for several years, before taking some time off to focus on his career and education. By day he's a marketing executive in the telecom world and by night he hangs out here at AV. You'll find him focusing on tech, design and the industry's future.
Thoughts?! We're all about community! Sound off in the comments, share your review or join the discussion in our forum.

Leave a Comment

 Latest Forum Messages
  1. germeezy1
    BMW continues to lose their way although there are rare glimpses of brilliance in the lineup.
    Tone
    2b2
    BMW Acknowledges It Is ‘The Ultimate Driving Machine’ No Longer,

    Holds Rallies to Scare Employees

    TTAC


    By Matt Posky on April 26, 2017


    As vehicle sales growth gradually cools off, BMW has found itself continuing to lose ground to its competitors — but it wasn’t always this way. The company spent years as the luxury brand par excellence before seeing the likes of Jaguar, Tesla, and historic rival Mercedes-Benz begin syphoning off its consumer base.

    It looked to be in denial for some time, but it is now evident that Bayerische Motoren Werke has become painfully aware of its own shortcomings. The company has even begun holding employee rallies to address its problems and potentially scare the crap out of workers. Since January, the German automaker has taken its marketing team, factory managers, 14,000 engineers, and a portion of its general workforce through day-long events that illustrate just how far it has fallen.

    Attending one of the rallies, Bloomberg highlighted just how consequential the rhetoric used was. “We’re in the midst of an electric assault,” said one of the event’s presenters amidst a slideshow of BMW’s rivals...


    What I'd prefer to see is BMW trying to imagine what driving pleasure might mean in a world where cars might be able to drive themselves. What made BMWs was the realizing that the sensory act of driving could, in itself, be a selling feature. The 1600 and 2002 were practical cars that offered the sensory pleasures of sports cars. Despite what fanbois like to believe, they weren't terribly fast -- even the first M3 wasn't much quicker than the 325is in low-speed acceleration -- but they were fun. BMW has walked away from that now. The cars (and SUVs) are undeniably fast, but with numb steering and meh design they aren't fun. They are simply icons of upward mobility -- Oldsmobiles for the modern age (and, we know how that turned out).

    Dr. Porsche once said something to the effect that the last car would be a sports car, that when nobody HAD to drive, the last cars would be the cars people wanted to drive. BMW seems determined to walk away from that market, yet there may be intriguing opportunities there. Perhaps for a Korean or Chinese company ....
    2b2
    BMW Acknowledges It Is ‘The Ultimate Driving Machine’ No Longer,

    Holds Rallies to Scare Employees

    TTAC


    By Matt Posky on April 26, 2017


    As vehicle sales growth gradually cools off, BMW has found itself continuing to lose ground to its competitors — but it wasn’t always this way. The company spent years as the luxury brand par excellence before seeing the likes of Jaguar, Tesla, and historic rival Mercedes-Benz begin syphoning off its consumer base.

    It looked to be in denial for some time, but it is now evident that Bayerische Motoren Werke has become painfully aware of its own shortcomings. The company has even begun holding employee rallies to address its problems and potentially scare the crap out of workers. Since January, the German automaker has taken its marketing team, factory managers, 14,000 engineers, and a portion of its general workforce through day-long events that illustrate just how far it has fallen.

    Attending one of the rallies, Bloomberg highlighted just how consequential the rhetoric used was. “We’re in the midst of an electric assault,” said one of the event’s presenters amidst a slideshow of BMW’s rivals...
    megeebee
    I suspect BMW decided to limit imports of the 5 because of the all-to-well-known depressed market for sedans. Nice to know that at least one is sought after.

    Being a designer at BMW must be either very challenging, or very boring. Being made to repeat the same themes and cues generation after generation.
    2b2
    Andrew_L
    not looking up #s by model but

    BMW overall didn't do so good last year


    Well interesting thing about that is even though they were down the whole year they still were 3rd place and sold 313k vehicles for the year. The brands near the bottom would kill for that.

    5-er

    32,408 = full-2016 sales

    44,162 = full-2015 sales

    –26.6% = DOWN

Welcome to AutoVerdict: News, Reviews, Community