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Unplugged: Chevrolet Volt Exiting Production in 2022

Unplugged: Chevrolet Volt Exiting Production in 2022

One of General Motors’ most iconic post-bankruptcy products may be getting the axe. The current generation Chevrolet Volt is not expected to see production last beyond 2022, which is when this version of the car is expected to end.

In recent months speculation surrounding the future of several GM sedans has surfaced. The most substantial rumors came from a Reuters report that suggested the company was ‘reviewing’ several of its sedans, including the plug-in hybrid Volt. The Volt, along with several other sedans mentioned in the report, are currently produced at the company’s Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant.

Now, GM Authority reports that AutoForecast Solutions is showing the Volt will exit production in 2022 as well with no replacement. AutoForecast is one of many analysts that track assembly plant utilization.

AutoVerdict has also been told by its own sources familiar with GM product plans that the Volt is unlikely to see its next-generation.

Killing one of its most iconic alternative energy products may seem like an extreme move, but it comes as little surprise. The Volt has fallen victim to broader consumer trends away from traditional sedan models in favor of crossovers and SUVs. In fact, Chevy’s own Bolt EV battery-electric vehicle has already out-sold the Volt as of the end of November. Meanwhile, Volt sales are off 12.5 percent.

While there is not expected to be a direct replacement for the Volt, there will be a slew of battery-powered GM products coming out around the time of its death. GM has already confirmed the company plans to roll out 20 new electrified models between now and 2023. This product onslaught is likely spurring GM to shed some slow selling sedan models to assist in funding what they view as their future product portfolio.





 

About Nick Saporito

AutoVerdict Senior Editor Nick Saporito began writing about cars at age 13. Nick ran a couple of automotive enthusiast sites for several years, before taking some time off to focus on his career and education. By day he's a marketing executive in the telecom world and by night he hangs out here at AV. You'll find him focusing on tech, design and the industry's future.
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  1. Tone
    germeezy1
    Ideally a constant rpm turbine that can run on any fuel would be a unique purchase proposition for the Volt. It would be far more compact, and lightweight than the current range extender.


    Agreed. The multi-fuel ability -- especially if it sold well -- would open up some interesting opportunities for localized energy.
    germeezy1
    Ideally a constant rpm turbine that can run on any fuel would be a unique purchase proposition for the Volt. It would be far more compact, and lightweight than the current range extender.
    Tone
    germeezy1
    Remember ICEs are most efficient in the heart of their BSFC maps not at elevated rpms.


    Very true. What’s obvious is that the current charge sustainer was selected because it was available and cost-efficient. It’s not terribly energy efficient in charge sustain mode. It also doesn’t package much better than any other small four cylinder, which given its job (keeping the battery packs at a sustained charge level) seems like a lot of space to require.

    If GM was to advance the state of the Voltec art, better batteries and a far more fuel and space efficient charge sustainer would be two obvious places to improve. Otherwise, it will just be another mainstream, hybrid vehicle in a couple of years.
    germeezy1
    Remember ICEs are most efficient in the heart of their BSFC maps not at elevated rpms.
    nsaporito
    tripowergto
    Your theoretical 700cc engine would cost more to engineer/produce than just using the 1.5L out of the parts bin.

    The Volt continues to have a necessary place in cold weather climates as the ICE can produce actual heat for passengers that electric only cars have yet to properly duplicate. My wife hates the cold. Even with heated seats the electric heat on our Volt is weak whereas the "waste" heat from the ICE is both welcomed and acceptable.


    I think certain market forces (namely regulation) are pushing everyone to electric, despite some clear disadvantages (as you mention).
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