Chevrolet may bring back a name from the past for one of its crossovers. At least, that is what sources are saying as it relates to the company’s pending replacement for the Chevrolet Traverse crossover. Allegedly some within GM and the brand’s advertising agency feel the Traverse needs a fresh start with an old name to fully catch up with the competition.

AutoVerdict has learned that Chevrolet’s global advertising agency, Commonwealth/McCann is encouraging the brand to rename the Traverse to Trailblazer when the all-new crossover arrives. Internals are citing the Trailblazer name recognition and pointing to the success of the Ford Explorer as logic for bringing back the iconic nameplate. GM has also tested the name in consumer clinics, but the results of the market research are not known. Commonwealth/McCann was reportedly an advocate for bringing back the Cavalier nameplate in China, also for the purposes of name recognition.

The Trailblazer name retired from the North American market back in 2009 when the GMT-365 midsize SUVs ended production. However, the name is actively utilized in many global markets for a Chevrolet midsize SUV targeted at developing and Southeast Asian markets. It is unclear how Chevrolet would handle the naming conflict, but recent news of Isuzu and GM dissolving their collaboration on midsize trucks may provide that answer. The global Trailblazer is based on Isuzu’s midsize truck platform, meaning its future is now in question since the partnership is over.

An all-new Traverse crossover is slated to hit the market late this year or early in 2017 as a 2018 model. Like the 2017 GMC Acadia, it is based on GM’s new C1 platform. This time the Traverse will not be a carbon-copy of the Acadia, though. The Chevrolet version will be riding on a longer wheelbase version of the C1 platform than the Acadia. Given the larger size, the Chevy version is expected to be exclusively powered by GM’s 3.6-liter V-6 with around 310 horsepower.

Chevrolet has their sights set squarely on the competitive midsize crossover segment, namely the Ford Explorer. The target was the same with the original Traverse, but today’s version has fallen short of sales expectations – both internal and market. Instead, the related Buick Enclave and GMC Acadia have both hugely out-performed GM’s original sales expectations, making up for the Traverse.

The success of the SUV-turned-crossover Explorer is partially fueling the idea of renaming the Traverse to Trailblazer. The Explorer has outsold the Traverse handled in recent years with it capturing 130,000 more sales than the Chevy so far in 2015.

Sources haven’t said when Chevrolet will make a decision regarding the name of the new crossover, but it will have to be soon. The new Traverse is expected to be revealed at this year’s Los Angeles Auto Show in November. Though a last minute name-change could push that back to Detroit in January.

The Trailblazer name retired from the North American market back in 2009 when the GMT-365 midsize SUVs ended production. However, the name is actively utilized in many global markets for a Chevrolet midsize SUV targeted at developing and Southeast Asian markets. It is unclear how Chevrolet would handle the naming conflict, but recent news of Isuzu and GM dissolving their collaboration on midsize trucks may provide that answer. The global Trailblazer is based on Isuzu’s midsize truck platform, meaning its future is now in question since the partnership is over.

An all-new Traverse crossover is slated to hit the market late this year or early in 2017 as a 2018 model. Like the 2017 GMC Acadia, it is based on GM’s new C1 platform. This time the Traverse will not be a carbon-copy of the Acadia, though. The Chevrolet version will be riding on a longer wheelbase version of the C1 platform than the Acadia. Given the larger size, the Chevy version is expected to be exclusively powered by GM’s 3.6-liter V-6 with around 310 horsepower.

Chevrolet has their sights set squarely on the competitive midsize crossover segment, namely the Ford Explorer. The target was the same with the original Traverse, but today’s version has fallen short of sales expectations – both internal and market. Instead, the related Buick Enclave and GMC Acadia have both hugely out-performed GM’s original sales expectations, making up for the Traverse.

The success of the SUV-turned-crossover Explorer is partially fueling the idea of renaming the Traverse to Trailblazer. The Explorer has outsold the Traverse handledly in recent years, with it capturing 130,000 more sales than the Chevy just in 2015.

Sources haven’t said when Chevrolet will make a decision regarding the name of the new crossover, but it will have to be soon. The new Traverse is expected to be revealed at this year’s Los Angeles Auto Show in November. Though a last minute name-change could push that back to Detroit in January.