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Chevrolet Camaro Axed After Current Generation

Chevrolet Camaro Axed After Current Generation

The Chevrolet Camaro nameplate will likely meet its death yet again, according to reports. The Chevrolet pony car reportedly has no next-generation model planned, something that comes as little surprise and validates information uncovered by AutoVerdict.

Today Muscle Cars & Trucks is reporting that the current Camaro is slated to last until 2023, after that the nameplate will die off. This report validates rumors AutoVerdict has been privy to in recent months, including a flat out “There is no next Camaro” comment from a GM insider.

The current car is based on the Alpha chassis that also underpins the Cadillac ATS and CTS. With both the ATS and CTS now dead and replaced with the A2XX-based CT4 and CT5, the current Camaro is the last remaining Alpha car. Originally GM was going to develop a seventh-generation Camaro on the A2XX architecture, but that project has been shelved.

News of the Camaro’s demise (again), comes as little surprise. The car has struggled from a sales perspective in the last year, with it being a solid #3 in the three-way pony car war with the Ford Mustang and Dodge Challenger.

Another tell-tale sign of the Camaro’s eventual fate came when Camaro Chief Engineer Al Oppenheiser was reassigned to an electric vehicle program. The Camaro program internally at GM now has only a few people working on it; likely tasked to keep the car going through 2023. Oppenheiser’s reassignment was a stunning move given his celebrity status with the Camaro Six program.

It’s unclear at this time if GM is planning to spin off some sort of indirect replacement for the Camaro; perhaps a coupe SUV? More likely, this will be a repeat of 2002 when Chevy killed the Camaro the first time around.





 

About Nick Saporito

AutoVerdict Senior Editor Nick Saporito began writing about cars at age 13. Nick ran a couple of automotive enthusiast sites for several years, before taking some time off to focus on his career and education. By day he's a marketing executive in the telecom world and by night he hangs out here at AV. You'll find him focusing on tech, design and the industry's future.
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  1. CobaltSSKing
    Tone
    This article says it's not cancelled, just delayed so it can move to the VSSR platform. https://driving.ca/auto-news/news/seventh-gen-camaro-reportedly-delayed-not-cancelled/amp?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter&__twitter_impression=true


    I originally thought with the delay of the next gen Caddy sedans that VSSR would be used instead of Alpha2.
    Tone
    This article says it's not cancelled, just delayed so it can move to the VSSR platform. https://driving.ca/auto-news/news/seventh-gen-camaro-reportedly-delayed-not-cancelled/amp?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter&__twitter_impression=true
    Tone
    Pony cars started as affordable, stylish personal cars that could be optioned to be reasonably quick. They've evolved into fairly expensive GT cars with retro-styling, which targets a small (if fairly affluent) market for folks wanting to relive their youth and small group of performance enthusiasts who just want a RWD platform that will take a lot of power.

    I do think if GM had nailed the styling on this generation Camaro, it would have sold a bit better. Whether it's worth the time and effort for what will always be a sub-100,000 unit market is an open question. In an age where non-enthusiasts equate SUVs and CUVs with 'nice cars' I'm not even that convinced that ponycars provide much of a halo outside of the dedicated enthusiast market.

    Here's one guy's take: I'm in my 50s and should be part of the market for ponycars: I like cars, I have money if I find something I really want, and I grew up with these as being the attainable dream cars. I don't really want one anymore, though. I want my daily driver to be able to do car stuff -- carry people and cargo without a ton of compromise -- while being decent to drive. And, if I'm living with the packaging compromises that are part and parcel of ponycars, I have to really, really love the design -- and I don't love any of the current ponycars. Plus, everywhere I drive is getting more and more congested, so big power is not terribly usable. None of the current crop really hits my buttons -- I'd probably be happier with a VW GTI or even a 'sporty CUV' than I would with any of the current ponycars. And, if I wanted a weekend car, I'd probably go even more impractical -- sports car rather than ponycar.

    Ponycars remind me a lot of classic rock. I grew up with it, I still like it, but I don't want to listen to it all the time anymore. Nostalgia is nice in small doses, but I don't want to spend my time looking backwards.

    Honestly, the only car on the market that excites me -- warts and all -- is the Tesla Model 3. A bit more of what I'd want to currently spend, but when the next gen slowly starts coming down in price, that's probably what I'll look at. Obviously Tesla's are far from perfect, but they are super interesting and provide a brand new driving experience. As an enthusiast, that's what excites me -- a digital remaster of 1969 just doesn't do it for me.
    CobaltSSKing
    Readying a performance two door EV makes more sense especially when the platform on the current 6th gen is plenty good for the next few years.
    Z284ever
    A source told me the current car is being extended 18 months and is not even aware of a 7th gen car development.
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