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Ford Mustang Mach-E Revealed

Ford Mustang Mach-E Revealed

Can an SUV be a Ford Mustang? More specifically, can a battery-electric SUV be a Ford Mustang? Ford Motor Company says the answer to both of those questions is yes and it’s hoping to prove it with the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, revealed this evening in Los Angeles.

Ford says the Mach-E started with a tiger team of Ford employees who started a project under the codeword “Edison.” Project Edison ultimately morphed into what is now the Mustang Mach-E, the company’s opening salvo into the world of battery-electric vehicles and a clear competitor to Tesla.

Just looking at the Mustang Mach-E, one can quickly conclude the design is effectively a Mustang SUV. The Mustang’s iconic rear lights and big hips are in tow. Up front Ford has pulled over the front clip design from the Mustang, removed the grille and juiced it up to look like a techy electric vehicle.

Speaking of electric, Ford is going to offer buyers several different options when it comes to powertrains. In base form the Mach-E is rear-wheel-drive, but buyers can opt for all-wheel-drive. The Mach-E will also offer two different battery pack sizes; the standard range model will feature a 75.7-kWh pack, while extended-range models will have a hefty 98.9-kWh pack that is good for an EPA rated 300 miles or more of range. Ford is not disclosing a range estimate for the base battery pack.

Ford also says the all-wheel-drive, extended-range version will generate 332 horsepower and 417 pound-feet of torque. Power ratings for other variants have not been disclosed.

In typical Mustang fashion, Ford also revealed a Mach-E GT. Aside from design difference from the base model, the GT version will generate an impressive 459 horsepower and 612 pound-feet of torque, propelling the electric SUV from zero to 60 mph in less than 4 seconds.

Inside, all Mustang Mach-E’s feature a simplistic interior design that features a Tesla-like massive touchscreen display in the center stack. However, unlike Tesla, Ford has retained an LCD panel in the gauge cluster area.

The massive displays feature an all-new version of Ford SYNC, which is the first iteration of SYNC that is cloud-connected. Customers will be able to speak naturally to the system and add new features to their Mach-E thanks to the 4G LTE connection.

Basically, the Mustang Mach-E is this weird lovechild of the traditional Mustang and a Tesla. Ford is acknowledging it is a risk to use an iconic badge like Mustang on this battery-electric SUV, but seems confident it is the right move. Time will tell if that ultimately validates.

Folks interested in the Mustang Mach-E can go online and reserve one for $500. Base versions should begin arriving next year, but Ford cautions deliveries of the GT version will not start until spring 2021.





 

About Nick Saporito

AutoVerdict Senior Editor Nick Saporito began writing about cars at age 13. Nick ran a couple of automotive enthusiast sites for several years, before taking some time off to focus on his career and education. By day he's a marketing executive in the telecom world and by night he hangs out here at AV. You'll find him focusing on tech, design and the industry's future.
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 One Comment

  1. Nov 18, 2019 at 5:05 pm

    This is an amazing vehicle. It looks like Ford may be ahead in the gave so far as all GM can seem to muster is talk. Prices really aren't that bad considering and the range available from what I see on Ford's website is respectable too.

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 Latest Forum Messages
  1. Tone
    carnut
    This is quite the vehicle. Pricing considering what you're getting isn't really that bad and the range pretty good too. It looks like Ford is ahead of the game when it comes to these types of products and so far all we get from GM is talk.


    Agreed on GM, but they could turn that around quickly. GM probably has as much or more BEV engineering experience than anyone else. They've been working on this since the EV1 and that builds deep engineering experience over time. I have little doubt they could bring a compelling product to market quickly.

    I've said this before, but where GM continually falls on its face is product planning and product management. For a company with the resources to build almost anything, they have little demonstrated capacity to build the right thing. As an enthusiast, that's frustrating. But, from a business side, it's a considerable waste of potential.

    Think about it: GM brought an affordable, competitively-performing BEV to the market with the Bolt. But, it's not a terribly desirable vehicle compared to the Model 3. It doesn't boast the kind of driver assistance technologies that Telsa and the Nissan Leaf offers, even though GM has a competitive technology. GM did nothing to advance the issue of charging on longer trips. All of these are product planning/management issue. GM is capable of addressing all of them, but it decided it didn't need to.

    I'm not sure how GM fixes that problem -- it's probably partly an internal process issue, but I suspect it's also cultural. GM doesn't seem to have people who have a good feel for the market and the evolving competitive environment.
    nsaporito
    Tone
    I don't love that it's called a Mustang. I read somewhere that originally Ford looked to build an BEV off an existing platform, but couldn't meet the engineering goals they had. When they asked for more development funds to build a bespoke platform, the business side insisted on using the Mustang name to justify the cost and drive volumes.

    So -- that aside, it does seem like a very interesting vehicle. Probably the closest thing to a Tesla Model Y/Porsche Macan competitor from a domestic automaker. I'll be very interested to see if they can get something with the performance and character, but initial impressions are positive.

    My current car only has 50,000 kms on it and I only drive about 12,000 kms a year. So, at the rate we're going, it's very possible my next vehicle will be electric. As an enthusiast, this is the most interesting shift in automotive engineering in my lifetime and I look forward to relearning how to drive swiftly to take advantage of what electrics are capable of!


    I agree on all accounts. I think Ford will regret using the Mustang badge over the long-run, but I get why they did it.

    The substance of the Mach-E is all on-point; I suspect it will do quite well on the market, though I do have to chuckle at how much Ford has mirrored Tesla with this (both in product and process).
    carnut
    This is quite the vehicle. Pricing considering what you're getting isn't really that bad and the range pretty good too. It looks like Ford is ahead of the game when it comes to these types of products and so far all we get from GM is talk.
    Tone
    I don't love that it's called a Mustang. I read somewhere that originally Ford looked to build an BEV off an existing platform, but couldn't meet the engineering goals they had. When they asked for more development funds to build a bespoke platform, the business side insisted on using the Mustang name to justify the cost and drive volumes.

    So -- that aside, it does seem like a very interesting vehicle. Probably the closest thing to a Tesla Model Y/Porsche Macan competitor from a domestic automaker. I'll be very interested to see if they can get something with the performance and character, but initial impressions are positive.

    My current car only has 50,000 kms on it and I only drive about 12,000 kms a year. So, at the rate we're going, it's very possible my next vehicle will be electric. As an enthusiast, this is the most interesting shift in automotive engineering in my lifetime and I look forward to relearning how to drive swiftly to take advantage of what electrics are capable of!
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